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NC WARN in the News

A few of the news articles citing NC WARN


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A Church Challenges Duke Energy Over Solar — WUNC

The church, it turns out, did not pay to install the solar panels, like a homeowner would. Instead, NC Warn, an advocacy group, paid for the panels and is selling electricity back to the church at about half the rate Duke Energy charges. It’s called third-party sales, and it’s illegal in just four states in the country: North Carolina, Oklahoma, Kentucky, and Florida.

Duke Energy turns to natural gas in place of coal — News & Record

Duke’s shift toward gas began in earnest about seven years ago, triggering the closure of coal-fired plants in Eden and six other North Carolina communities, replacing them with five plants that use gas as their primary fuel. Clean-energy advocate Jim Warren believes Duke is reaping a public relations bonanza by shifting from a bad fossil fuel to another that’s only a bit less problematic.

Red tape preventing Greensboro church from getting solar energy — News & Record

It’s the latest chapter in a solar industry saga in which North Carolina soars above other states in many categories of solar deployment linked to large-scale commercial power projects, but paradoxically it lags in dispersing this burgeoning technology onto rooftops throughout its cities and rural areas.

Freedom Act would allow third-party sales of solar power in N.C. — News & Record

If it [the Energy Freedom Act] becomes law, it would legalize the solar partnership between NC WARN and the Greensboro church without the need for commission approval of the local plan, which is aimed at trailblazing a method of financing that could make solar-energy system affordable for more people.

Greensboro church installs solar panels, challenges Duke on selling electricity — News & Record

Faith Community Church and the advocacy group NC WARN unveiled a partnership in which the Durham-based nonprofit has installed solar panels on the African American congregation’s rooftop to produce electricity for sale to the church.

Solar power and competition are good for all customers — Winston Salem Journal

It is curious that Duke Energy is aggressively lobbying against the new Energy Freedom Act, bipartisan state legislation that would open the door to rooftop solar competition, thereby helping the same low-wealth communities for which Duke now professes concern.

I-Team: Flaw Found in Harris Nuclear Power Plant Reactor Head — ABC 11 News

Duke Energy officials describe the flaw as a small depression in a welding seam. They say the public was never in danger. Critics aren't so sure. "The industry has had this problem for a number of years and they haven't been able to figure out how to prevent it from occurring," said Jim Warren, with the nuclear watchdog group NC WARN.

Duke Energy called out for targeting black community with ‘cynical’ anti-solar campaign — Facing South

A North Carolina minister and an environmental watchdog have sent a letter to Duke Energy President and CEO Lynn Good, criticizing the utility giant for targeting African-American community leaders as part of its campaign against rooftop solar.

Solarize program aims to make solar power affordable — News & Record

If energy activist Jim Warren has anything to say about it, solar panels one day will grace the rooftops of every suitable house, store, office and factory statewide. But he and his Solarize NC program are taking it a few cities at a time, and the Greensboro area is next on their agenda.

N.C. Supreme Court upholds Duke Energy’s 5.1% rate hike — Charlotte Business Journal

The N.C. Supreme Court has upheld the most recent Duke Energy Carolinas rate increase, ruling in the last of a spate of challenges to Duke utility rate cases filed by the N.C. Attorney General's office and advocacy groups....NC WARN Executive Director Jim Warren responded that the decision amounts to the court allowing Duke "to continue rigging electricity rates against small customers."
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