Building people power for
climate & energy justice

Coal

Due to its size, Duke Energy is pivotal in the fight over coal vs climate. NC WARN and allies blocked the first of two Cliffside units Duke wanted to build – by proving it wasn’t necessary — and continued to struggle against the second unit. More recently, we’ve been protesting Duke Energy’s toxic coal ash spill into the Dan River, and working to ensure that North Carolina electricity customers do not foot the bill for the cleanup of the Dan River and Duke’s other coal ash sites.

Sub-categories

Debunking Duke Energy Deception over Emissions, Coal Plant Closures — News Release from NC WARN

NC WARN urges news outlets to scrutinize the corporate PR more closely. CEO Lynn Good repeated the greenwashing stats yet again at the May 7 stockholder meeting: emissions are down, and we’ve closed more than 20 coal-fired power plants. NC WARN’s analysis shows why that claim is bogus.

Will Duke Energy Leave Poisoned Sites Behind? — News Release from NC WARN

Today NC WARN sent [Duke Energy] CEO Lynn Good a letter seeking information about Duke’s intentions [for contaminated coal ash dumpsites].  We also urged her to correct the lousy, secretive process that has led to growing public mistrust about Duke’s coal ash plans.

NC WARN Denounces Duke Energy Coal Ash Plan — News Release from NC WARN

NC WARN is strongly opposed to Duke Energy's announcement today that it plans to transfer its coal ash negligence to Chatham and Lee counties.

NC WARN Demands Duke Energy Withdraw Applications for Toxic Waste Landfills in Lee and Chatham — News Release from NC WARN

NC WARN is increasing our legal and grassroots support for Lee-Chatham citizen groups, local governments and nonprofit allies opposing the clay mine scheme, just as we are helping communities already impacted by coal ash to fight for justice amid this ongoing statewide catastrophe.

In Chatham and Lee counties, opposition rises against coal ash disposal plan — News & Observer

“This is a statewide problem,” Nick Wood, an organizer for NC Warn, a nonprofit energy-industry watchdog, told a group of people gathered at the volunteer fire department in Moncure on Thursday night to discuss strategy. “We need a statewide solution.”

Environmental groups to host forum Thursday on coal ash — Sun Journal

Several environmental watchdog groups will host a forum and discussion Thursday at the New Bern-Craven County Public Library on the topic, “Coal Ash Ponds on Our Rivers.”

The Spill at Dan River — CBS 60 Minutes

Every year coal-burning power plants generate not only electricity, but a staggering amount of leftover coal ash that contains heavy metals unhealthy to humans. Yet due in part to intense industry lobbying, there are no federal regulations on its disposal. It's left to the states to oversee some of the most powerful utility companies in the country.

Residents air concerns, frustrations over Robeson County coal ash site at meeting — Fayetteville Observer

The 16 people who attended watched a few short films about coal-related pollution. That was followed by a discussion led by organizer Nick Wood of NC Warn, a group that advocates for climate protection through the use of clean energy, and Christine Ellis of the Winyah Rivers Foundation.

Critics skeptical of claim that coal ash cleanup is finished — ABC 11

It's the headline that has environmentalists and folks who live along the Dan River so fired up: "Duke Energy Completes Cleanup Work Along the Dan River." In Rockingham County, they just don't believe that, or they don't understand it. "If you get out and go three inches deep in the sand, you're in coal ash," said Ben Adkins.

NC House Passes Tillis-Duke Burn-the-Public Coal Ash Bill — Statement from NC WARN

The NC House has just passed a "Thom Tillis-Duke Energy Burn the Public" coal ash bill. The bill leaves North Carolinians at the mercy of two regulators -- DENR and the Utilities Commission -- that have sorry track records of backroom dealing with Duke Energy on issues involving safety and electric rate fairness. There will be very little clean-up, but the public will likely pay billions as Duke turns coal ash failure into a profit center.
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